John Crosser III, theatre senior, and Cody Davis, music education & theatre senior, audition for roles in "Romeo and Juliet." Davis auditioned for the lead of Romeo, while Croser auditioned for one of various side characters. Auditions took place on Jan. 13 in Richardson Auditorium. The role of Romeo was awarded to Justin Tinker, nursing freshman. Juliet will be played by Cooper Hart, theatre freshman

John Crosser III, theatre senior, and Cody Davis, music education & theatre senior, audition for roles in "Romeo and Juliet." Davis auditioned for the lead of Romeo, while Croser auditioned for one of various side characters. Auditions took place on Jan. 13 in Richardson Auditorium. The role of Romeo was awarded to Justin Tinker, nursing freshman. Juliet will be played by Cooper Hart, theatre freshman

By Sally McGruire
Staff reporter

Two fighting families, love at first sight, jealousy, rage, sword fighting, miscommunication and the dagger in the heart could mean nothing else but “Romeo and Juliet.”

This upcoming March the theater department will be performing the well-known play.

The play was chosen to be performed by Campus Players last spring.  “This play was meant for everyone,” said Roger Moon, director of theatre program. “The Campus Players want original, contemporary, traditional and all kinds of works to be performed.”

The South Kansas Symphony Orchestra, directed by Daniel Stevens, associate professor of strings music, will be playing alongside the actors and actresses.  There will be little if any curtains up for the play, exposing the brick in the back of the stage, and also the orchestra that will be sitting at the back of the stage.  They will not use the prologue in “Romeo and Juliet” for the beginning. Moon said, “The orchestra will be playing music by Tchaikovsky, while the cast creates that physical language.”

This means dance and movement will be added to the production. The prologue gives away the beginning, middle and end of the entire story, so just in case someone in the crowd has never read the story or seen the movie, they will be in for a surprise.

Moon will also be editing the script. Acting the whole tragedy would take hours and hours. “This won’t be an imaginary world that we try to create.  We ask the audience to imagine, and the audience in interacted with, but we’re not trying to create historical accuracy,” said Moon.

This play has many roles for men. Justin Tinker, nursing freshman, is taking on the role of Romeo. It is his first Shakespearean play, but he’s ready for the stresses that performances may bring. “The memorizing will most certainly be a crucial element in the amazing stress this production will bring,” said Tinker. “The show has such a vast depth of unique gems with wondrous talents that surpass most I have met, so having such a cast of theatrical talent monoliths ups the excitement and the stress.”

Overall, Moon is excited for what the play will bring.  “I love working with Daniel Stevens. He is so intelligent and an inspiration to people, and getting to work with him and these students will be great,” said Moon. “The play pushes and inspires the cast.”

The cast will spend two weeks of preparation before blocking. Dates of the Shakespearean tragedy are March 3, 5 and 7.

Sally McGuire is a freshman with an undeclared major.  You may e-mail her at sally.mcguire@sckans.edu.