By Dalton Carver
Staff reporter

As the second most consumed liquid in the world, tea must be doing something right. With claims that it contains the ingredients to keep illness at bay, as well as containing elements such as fluoride and traces of bone strengtheners, tea could become the new beverage of choice.

According to webmd.com, the major health benefits are due to the large amount of antioxidants that tea contains, almost ten times more than the amount found in most fruits and vegetables. The main varieties of tea, including green, black and oolong, all come from the same plant, known as Camellia sinensis, which house an extreme number of polyphenols, a type of antioxidant.

Research done in tea drinking countries, such as Japan and China, have shown that individuals suffer much less from heart disease and certain kinds of cancer that non-tea drinkers occasionally succumb to. Some other maladies that tea may prevent include blood clot formations, atherosclerosis, stroke, and even aid in weight loss. All of these benefits are accessible through drinking two or more cups per day. However, despite the strong evidence that points to these health benefits, the research surrounding antioxidants and tea is still being collected. For these benefits to be truly confirmed, much more studies will have to be done.

A question commonly pondered by tea drinkers is which is better for you: Brewed tea or bottled tea? “Brewed, definitely,” said Zenas Lopez, theater and business freshman. “It has a lot of organic material like dried leaves and there’s no added material.”

Ronan McStravick, business administration freshman, agrees. “It’s made with fresher ingredients that aren’t manufactured,” he said. “It also really perks me up, so I usually end up drinking about two cups a day.”

On the subject of health benefits, Lopez was on the same page as top researchers. “It contains antioxidants and it just really relaxes me,” he said. “I don’t really feel any healthier after I drink it though.”

“I’ve heard it really helps your heart,” said McStravick. “A tea a day keeps the doctor away.”

Dalton is a freshman majoring in communication. You may email him at dalton.carver@sckans.edu.