David Gardner, assistant professor of music and director of choirs, helps students with preparation for their Home Concert, which will be at 7:30 p.m. tonight in Richardson Auditorium.  Twelve members of the choir will journey to New York City where they will be a part of a choir of 200 students from around the country to sing a set of the Mozart Vespers at Carnegie Hall on March 19.  Photo by Samantha Gillis, Collegian Photographer

David Gardner, assistant professor of music and director of choirs, helps students with preparation for their Home Concert, which will be at 7:30 p.m. tonight in Richardson Auditorium. Twelve members of the choir will journey to New York City where they will be a part of a choir of 200 students from around the country to sing a set of the Mozart Vespers at Carnegie Hall on March 19. Photo by Samantha Gillis, Collegian Photographer

For a dozen members of the A Cappella Choir, this spring break will be special. The choir will arrive in New York City on March 16 and perform in Carnegie Hall on March 19.

They will be performing a set of the Mozart Vespers. The collection was written by Mozart at a young age, while he stayed in Salzburg. He did two complete vespers texts, and the choir will perform one set, and another conductor and choir will perform the other set.

“The choir will be about 200 singers. I’ve invited choirs all over the country that will be joining us,” said Dr. David Gardner, assistant professor of music and director of choirs.

Other schools joining the choir are Douglass High School, Ottawa University, Pawnee Heights High School in Burdett, Wichita High School Northwest, Bismarck State College in Bismarck, N.D., Colleton County High School in Walterboro, S.C., Forest Lake Academy in Apopka, Fla., The University of Wyoming in Laramie, Wyo.

Timothy Shook, professor of music said, “I have not performed at Carnegie Hall, but I have been there.” This will change for the professor as he joins faculty member Daniel Stevens, assistant professor of strings music, and Philip Stevens, Daniel’s brother, on the evening of March 16 in Carnegie Hall at 8 o’clock.

Although Stevens has not performed at Carnegie Hall before, he has performed alongside his brother for two years now. Stevens said any performance brings nerves no matter where it is located, but I am sure we will do fine.

The trio will perform a piece by Max Bruch, a piece by Rolla and a piece by Rebecca Clark that was transcribed by faculty member Chris Schmitz, assistant professor of music. Shook said, “Somebody will be flying over from England to hear the transcription to see if it can be published.”

Many consider it an honor to play in Carnegie Hall. Gardner said, “Playing in Carnegie Hall is considered a milestone in a classical musician’s career. When I conducted there the first time, the most intimidating thing was the dressing room, and I looked around the wall. It had all the famous conductors of the 20th century. These are the giants of the classical music world and there were their autographed pictures just saying, ‘Thanks Carnegie Hall.’ I thought wow. All these guys have changed their pants in this room too.”